Verbal Agreement Law Philippines

Verbal Agreement Law in the Philippines: What You Need to Know

In the Philippines, the law on verbal agreements can be a bit confusing. While verbal agreements are legally binding, they can be difficult to enforce in court. In this article, we`ll explore the legal implications of verbal agreements in the Philippines and provide tips on how to protect yourself in these types of situations.

What is a Verbal Agreement?

A verbal agreement is a contract that is made orally rather than in writing. These agreements can be made in person, over the phone, or even through email. In the Philippines, verbal agreements are legally binding just like written contracts.

Verbal agreements are common in many industries, particularly in businesses that rely heavily on personal relationships and trust. For example, a freelance writer may verbally agree to complete a project for a client without a written contract. While these types of agreements are common, they can also be risky as they can be difficult to prove in court.

Enforcing a Verbal Agreement

In the Philippines, the burden of proof is on the party who is seeking to enforce the verbal agreement. This means that if you are trying to enforce a verbal agreement in court, you will need to provide evidence that the agreement was made and that both parties agreed to the terms.

To prove a verbal agreement, you may need to rely on witness testimony or recordings of the agreement. It`s important to note that recordings of conversations must be made with the consent of all parties involved, otherwise, they may not be admissible in court.

Protecting Yourself in Verbal Agreements

To protect yourself in verbal agreements, it`s important to take certain steps to ensure that the agreement is legally binding. First, make sure that you fully understand the terms of the agreement. If you are unsure about any of the terms, ask for clarification.

Secondly, it`s a good idea to document the agreement in writing, even if it`s just a brief summary of the key terms. This can help to clarify any misunderstandings that may arise in the future.

Finally, consider having the agreement notarized. While notarization is not required for verbal agreements, it can help to provide additional evidence of the agreement`s validity.

Conclusion

While verbal agreements are legally binding in the Philippines, they can be difficult to enforce in court. To protect yourself in these types of situations, make sure that you fully understand the terms of the agreement, document the agreement in writing, and consider having it notarized. By taking these steps, you can help to ensure that your verbal agreements are legally binding and enforceable.